Workout of the Week #9

I will be taking a break on the WOW workouts to prep up for the next challenge. Therefore, this week will be the last workout until the challenge begins in September. I will be developing an entirely new blog devoted to nutrition and workouts that will correspond with fat loss. I will begin taking names for those that wish to compete in the next challenge. Until September….here is the final WOW:

10 Rounds of:

10x burpees
10x squats
10x push-ups
10x sit-ups

All exercises are using only your bodyweight. This is a great example on how to design a workout that can be completed at home without the use of equipment. Enjoy the last workout of the week and post your best time possible!

Thank you to all that put forth the effort each week in the WOW challenge 🙂

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Workout of the Week #8

https://i0.wp.com/crossfitzone.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/motivational_quotes_and_photos_1-570x349.jpg

3 Rounds for time:

Row 1,000 meters (Damper set at 5/6)

35x Wall Ball Shots (20 M / 12 W)

50x double-unders or 150x Single Unders (Jump Rope)

Run 800m (0.50 mile) on a treadmill or complete 800m (0.50 mile) on an elliptical set at a resistance of 12.

https://i2.wp.com/media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/236x/2c/26/56/2c2656fcedc2fccb343988edb2e489be.jpg

Rowing Technique…

The Rowing Stroke

The rowing stroke can be divided into two parts: The drive and the recovery.

You will learn a coordinated movement pattern built upon the following positions and phases:

The Recovery (Phase 1)

  • Extend your arms until they straighten.
  • Lean your upper body forward to the one o’clock position.
  • Once your hands and the oar handle have cleared your knees, allow your knees to bend and gradually slide the seat forward on the monorail.

The Catch (Position 1)

  • Arms are straight; head is neutral; shoulders are level and not hunched.
  • Upper body is at the one o’clock position—shoulders in front of hips.
  • Shins are vertical and not compressed beyond the perpendicular.
  • Balls of the feet are in full contact with the footplate.

The Drive (Phase 2)

  • With straight arms and while maintaining the position of the upper body at one o’clock, exert pressure on the foot plate and begin pushing with your legs.
  • As your legs approach straight, lean the upper body back to the eleven o’clock position and draw the hands back to the lower ribs in a straight line.

The Finish (Position 2)

  • Legs are extended and handle is held lightly at your lower ribs.
  • Upper body is at the eleven o’clock position—slightly reclined with good support from your core muscles.
  • Head is in a neutral position.
  • Neck and shoulders are relaxed, and arms are drawn past the body with flat wrists.

Here is a link that shows you a video on rowing technique:

http://www.concept2.com/indoor-rowers/training/technique-videos

https://i1.wp.com/www.crossfitm0.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/awesome-inspirational-quotes-pics_ocilw_16-e1336169510875.jpg

Wall Ball Technique…

Keep the Torso Vertical
The more upright your torso, the more you can translate power from your hips into the wallball.  Here are a couple of things that will help you:

  • Foot placement
    Play with the placement of your feet, the wider your feet the greater amount of space we have for our hips to go down.  Bearing in mind we don’t want to be so wide that we are unable to gain depth (hips below knees) or so wide that we lose vertical drive.  As a start, I would recommend going slightly wider then shoulder width apart, and more toed out then usual.
  • Move your hips in a vertical plane and not a horizontal plane
    If you emphasize moving your torso up and down rather than back and forth you will save your back and use more legs to drive the ball up.

The Throw

  • Throw towards the wall, not just straight up and down
    Without any horizontal force you risk not touching the wall.  If you do touch the wall with just a purely vertical throw, the ball will probably slide down the wall and impact your ability to reload quickly as you will need to change body positions to catch it.  There needs to be a subtle bounce at the apex of the throw.
  • Forearms vertical and under the ball – elbows down!
    Imagine your forearms as arrows, they need to point where you want the ball to go – UP!

The Catch

  • Catch high, ride low
    Catch the wall ball high, and let it ride/push you to the bottom – imagine your self like a human piston.  When you get tired your instinct will be to catch high and hold the ball in your hands.  This doesn’t put us in a good position to reload, as we will need to hoist the ball back to our shoulders, or do a weird under arm throw.  So as much as you can, catch it high, and ride it low with the elbows under the ball.

wall-ball-a-ex.jpgwall-ball-a-ex.jpgwall-ball-a-ex.jpg

https://i1.wp.com/crossfitsantafe.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/likeit_quote_quotes_impossible_crossfit_done-e5d02b25e7d948252c556d45889d4621_h_large.jpg

Double Under Technique… (this is a skill and will require coordination and timing)

Jump and pass rope under feet twice per jump.

Single Under Technique

Jump and pass rope under feet once per jump.

https://i1.wp.com/media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/236x/6f/8b/f5/6f8bf5e00f418fd0979a0ddf41bba287.jpg

Other factors to consider:

  • Hands in front of torso
  • Hands rotate from wrist
  • Good up and down bounce
  • Jump when rope is about to hit the ground
  • Practice linked singles, alternating single and double unders, and then linked double unders
  • Practice plyometric bounce with feet to develop the footwork/ jumping technique necessary for a double underThe Double Under jump rope exercise is extremely beneficial in building overall muscle strength and conditioning in your legs, core, and upper body. Your entire body must get involved in order to execute the movement successfully.1. Choose a RopeThis is the most important element in this exercise. Ropes come in many different colors, lengths, weights, materials, and levels of thickness. I recommend a thinner or slightly weighted rope to facilitate a quicker moving rope. This skill is about speed and control. The rope needs to be at a length that is comfortable for you.The jump rope handles should go past your waist about 3 – 6 inches when you stand on the rope with both feet about shoulder width apart. You will be able to compensate for the length by moving your arms closer or further away from your body when you start jumping. You can also tie a few knots in the rope or wrap the rope around your hands if it is not a rope you own.2. Learn to control the Jump Rope

    This is key because you have to learn to jump the rope and not let the rope jump you. Develop a fast-moving rope with single unders, and with practice you will develop the ability to speed the rope up and slow it down. If you can get control of the rope, controlling your jump becomes easy. Naturally, regardless of your level of coordination you should feel your timing becoming better and better to where it becomes muscle memory.

    3. Attempt your first Double Under

    Once you have adequate control of the rope, where you can actively control the speed of the rope without stopping, then you are ready to attempt your first double under. Take 3 – 5 single jumps first then with a quick strong wiping motion of your wrist, speed the rope up and jump about 2 – 3 inches higher to have enough clearance as the rope goes under your feet 2 times. Your jump should be as relaxed as possible. If you find yourself expending a large amount of energy to successfully execute one double under, then some more fine tuning needs to take place. Efficiency in movement is the key to your success.

    4. Develop a Rhythm

    Once you can execute one double under successfully it is time to start stringing 5 – 10 – 15 jumps together in a row. Start developing your natural jump rope rhythm. For example, use a rhythm of 3 single jumps to ever 1 double under. Doing so will allow you to reset mentally as you prepare for the next attempt. Experiment with a few different jumping patterns and as you continue to practice, as you get better start taking away the single jumps until you are only doing the double unders.

    5. Adjust and Refine to develop consistency

    Based on your coordination level developing the double under jump rope skill will vary. The key is to continue to make small adjustments as you continue to practice. Just like learning to ride a bike or drive a car you must develop a feel for the double under jump rope skill. A comfortable, controlled and relaxed jump is what you are searching for. Once your skill level improves experiment with different speeds by slowing the rope down and speeding the rope up. Remember the better you can control the rope the easier it is to jump the rope. Practice until it becomes muscle memory. When you can make 20 in a row look easy you have made it to the top of the double under mountain.

    Troubleshooting: 4 common problems addressed

    1. I have trouble controlling the rope.

    Try using more wrist and less arms. Try adjusting your grip on the handles (i.e. move hands closer to the rope). Try extending your arms out further from your body. Try a rope made out of a different material. Experiment with different rope lengths.

    2. The rope keeps hitting the front of my toes when I try to jump.

    Try raising your knees higher when you jump until you get better control of the rope speed. Try raising your toes up as you jump.

    3. When I attempt a double under I land hard and start falling backward.

    Try jumping higher using mostly ankles and your calf muscles. Lean slightly forward as you jump to counter act your tendency to fall backward.

    4. I can only get about 3 – 5 in a row before I mess up, what is my problem?

    You must relax and increase your concentration level. We are not perfect beings so you must pay close attention and continually making small (micro) adjustments to keep your rhythm steady. Your mind and body must be in sync in order to roll off 50 – 75 double unders in a row.

    https://i0.wp.com/media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/9c/1b/4a/9c1b4aeda148f93f0a8e22bb3eb878b3.jpg

  • Posted in Uncategorized | 6 Comments

    Workout of the week #7

    4 Rounds for time of:

    10x Barbell Push Press (115 M / 65 W)

    10x Barbell Deadlift (225 M / 135 W)

    20x Bar Facing Burpees

     

    Barbell Push Press Technique:

    https://i1.wp.com/www.fitbie.com/sites/default/files/barbell-push-press-b-ex.jpg

    Bottom portion of lift

    https://i0.wp.com/www.fitbie.com/sites/default/files/barbell-push-press-c-ex.jpg

    Top portion of lift

    https://i0.wp.com/www.mens-health.com.my/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/push-press.jpg

    Complete motion of lift

     

     

    Hand placement
    Start with your hands just outside of your shoulders or a bit closer, depending on your mobility/flexibility. The key is to be close enough to still get your elbows somewhat under the bar – this gives you more leverage when you start to drive with the upper body.

    Wider hand placements are generally used for the jerk; where you get a lot more hip power in comparison to the push press.

    This is too tight:

    The Push Press

    The elbows are close together but drawn forward – not a good leverage position.

    This is too wide:

    The Push Press

    The elbows are too wide to get under the bar.

    This is just right:

    The Push Press

    This position allows you to get your elbows under the wrists.

    Elbow Positioning
    To lift heavy weights, you must put yourself in the best possible position.  The elbows should be placed as close under the bar as possible without sacrificing the rack positioning. This will help you get your shoulders and triceps into the movement – once you have the required momentum from the hips.

    Here’s good elbow position:

    The Push Press

    And this is bad elbow position:

    The Push Press

    Standing Position
    Your standing position in the push press is extremely important.  If your weight distribution is off, the initial dip will fall apart, resulting in you having to waste valuable energy to correct it.

    What I’ve found to be extremely useful is to lean back.  At first it will feel weird, but once you get used to it you’ll experience a huge difference in terms of smoothness and power.

    The Dip
    The dip has to be focused on staying upright – if the hips dip back, the vector force will go forward and wasted energy must be spent correcting it.

    Key Points:

    The dip is shallow; around a quarter of the way.
    Don’t dip too fast, otherwise you’ll separate from the bar.
    Don’t dip back or forward, just straight down. Bend through the legs while keeping your torso straight up.

    The Drive

    This is where all the momentum comes from.  If you’ve followed the above steps, you should be locked and loaded, ready to drive the weight up with force.

    Key Points:

    • Keep your chest upright.
    • Let your legs/hips initiate the movement.  Some people tend to be over eager and start pushing with the upper body too quickly.  This can screw up the whole pattern and diminish your power output, meaning less weight being pushed.

    Bottom line, be patient and let the legs do the work.

    Overhead

    The final step is the overhead positioning.  Here you’ll want the bar to be aligned directly over your center of mass – too far back or forward can create a miss or potentially lead to injury.

    Another mistake I see is with head positioning, with some over-exaggerating the head movement.  Here you should simply tuck your chin – do not push your head forward! Pushing your head too far forward can cause your body to move forward with it.

    Summary of technique….

    Hand Placement: A little wider than shoulder-width apart.
    Standing Position: Lean back with a straight torso.
    Dip: Keep your torso as straight as possible and bend through the legs.
    Drive: Initiate the movement with the legs, not the upper body.
    Overhead: Bar should be placed over the crown of the head, and head isn’t pushed forward.

     

    Barbell Deadlift Technique:

    http://i1.wp.com/barbellacademy.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/how_to_sumo_deadlift_with_proper_form.png?resize=624%2C251

    Conventional (Left) and Sumo Style Deadlift (Right)

    Deadlift Form

    http://crossfitpayson.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/deadlift.jpg

    Technique is the number one thing you should look at when you get stuck on Deadlifts.  It doesn’t matter which grip you take wether it be sumo or conventional if your technique isn’t good you’ll develop weakness and / or injury, which is definitely something you want to avoid.  However, perfect technique will lead to stronger deadlifts and a much lower injury risk.  Two things you definitely want.

    – Your lower back should be in a neutral position because rounding your lower back can be dangerous particularly when lifting heavier weights.
    – Your arms should be straight at all times.  Bending them could lead to bicep tears.
    – Your abs and lats should be tight throughout the duration of each and every rep.  This will help to stop your lower back from rounding and keep your spine in a neutral position.
    – Keep the bar close to your body at all times.  If it moves away from your body you’ll put extra unneeded stress on your lower back and this will drastically limit the amount of weight you can lift.  There’s a reason the best deadlifters have scars on their shins.

    Here’s how to deadlift in 5 easy steps:

    1) Stand with the bar above the center of your feet — your stance should be a bit more narrow than shoulder-width to give your arms room.

    2) Grab the bar overhand so your arms are vertical to the floor

    3) Bend through your knees until your shins hit the bar which remain above the middle of your feet.  Shoulder blades directly over the bar.

    4) Lift your chest but don’t squeeze your shoulder blades.  Just put your shoulders back and down, head inline with the rest of your spine.

    5) Pull by keeping the bar close to your body, roll it over the knees and thighs until hips and knees are locked.  Do not lean back at the top.

     

    Bar Facing Burpees Technique:

    https://gundys90daychallenge.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/edebf-img_1416.jpg

    Everyone knows how much I love burpees and all the variations.  Here is one of my favorites, the bar facing burpee (insert evil laugh here).

    Standard technique is for your body to be perpendicular to the bar, touch your chest and thighs to the floor and then jump over the bar with your feet together.  You may take a small step forward before jumping over.  If you have knee issues feel free to step over the bar instead of jumping.  Once you jump over the bar, turn around and perform another burpee before jumping the bar again.

    And now, here are five reasons why burpees are awesome—and why they should be your new favorite exercise:

    1) They burn mega calories

    Burpees make your body a fat burning machine.

    That’s because since burpees are an intense fully body exercise, they burn a ton of calories. Plus, research shows that high intensity exercises like burpees burn up to 50% more fat than moderate exercising.

    And better yet, they speed up your metabolism throughout the day—meaning you’ll burn more calories all day long, even after your burpee hell is over.

    So if you want to lose weight, ditch the recumbent bike and elliptical machine—and do some burpees instead.

    2) They make you stronger

    The burpee is a full body strength training exercise and the ultimate example of functional fitness.

    With every rep, you’ll work your arms, chest, quads, glutes, hamstrings, and abs.  After a few sets of burpees, your legs should feel a little bit like lead.

    3) They’re great for conditioning

    Why do you think burpees are embraced in the hardest of workouts (like CrossFit)?

    Because they’re great for developing conditioning and endurance!  And they get your heart rate up—fast.

    Burpees are a great way to get in shape quickly, whether your goal is to learn a new sport, train for a triathlon, hike a big mountain, or, just to look good.

    4) They’re portable and require no equipment

    The best thing about burpees?  They require absolutely no equipment.

    That’s right. Zip. Zero. Zilch.

    You can do burpees in your house, in a nearby park, even in your hotel room!

    5) You can add them to almost any workout

    Unlike running, which is a slow, monotonous form of exercising (unless you’re sprinting), burpees are fast paced, dynamic, and never boring.

    Like I already mentioned, adding burpees to your workout routine will bring you tons of benefits and whip you into shape quicker than you ever thought possible.

    Remember to practice safe technique and follow my instructions.  The prescribed weights are heavy so please modify as necessary as to complete the workout and not get injured.  This is meant to challenge you….not destroy you.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Posted in Uncategorized | 7 Comments

    Workout of the Week #6

    4 Rounds for time:

    50x Double Unders or 150x Single Unders (jump rope)

    20x Push-ups

    15x T2B (toes to bar) or 20x Hanging Leg Raise (ab straps) or 30x Sit-ups

     

    Double Under Technique

    Jump and pass rope under feet twice per jump.

    Single Under Technique

    Jump and pass rope under feet once per jump.

    Toes to Bar Technique

    Hang from the bar at full extension.  Raise toes up until they touch the bar.  Upper torso will drop back slightly during the raise.  Return to starting position.

    Hanging Leg Raise

    Start by placing your arms through the straps for support.  Make sure your upper arm is fully supported.  Start with your legs fully extended.  Raise your legs up and bend the knees as high as possible.  Return the legs to the starting position.

    Sit-ups

    Start by laying on your back with your feet flat on the ground.  Curl your upper torso off the floor until your elbows touch the knees.  Lower the body back to the floor.

     

    Posted in Uncategorized | 8 Comments

    Workout of the Week #5

    5 Rounds of:

     

    400m Run or Row

    10 pull-ups

    20 push-ups

    30 sit-ups

    40 squats

     

    The exercises in this workout should need no review.  These are all bodyweight exercises that we all do on a regular basis.  The only thing I will cover is how you can perform the pull-up exercise if you cannot complete a pull-up with your bodyweight.  Pull-ups can be done (using a power band, assisted machine, lat pull down machine, or just using your bodyweight)

    Pull-up Technique

    This first photo represents a person that is utilizing a power band to assist her bodyweight.  Simply looping it around a pull-up bar and supporting the foot in the band will allow most people, not all, to complete the number of pull-ups.  This can be a difficult tool to use when alone.

    The next picture represents a person that is using an assisted pull-up machine.  Notice that her arms are fully extended at the bottom before she pulls up to end the movement with her chin over the bar.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Another method to complete the pull-ups is to use a lat pulldown machine.

     

     

    Posted in Uncategorized | 9 Comments

    Workout of the Week #4

    5 rounds for time:

    10x Man Makers (use a weight this is comfortable yet challenging),

    30x Air Squats,

    50x Double whip smash (battling ropes),

     

    Man Makers Technique

    1. Step 1: Start with a dumbbell in each hand and stand straight up.
    2. Step 2: Bend down, place the dumbbells on the ground, and then kick your feet out behind you so that you are in a plank position.
    3. Step 3: Stay in a plank position and pull the dumbbell in your right hand up to the side of your chest and lower it back down.
    4. Step 4: Stay in a plank position and pull the dumbbell in your left hand up to the side of your chest and lower it back down.
    5. Step 5: Kick your feet back up under your body and lift the dumbbells slightly off the ground so that you are now in a squat position.
    6. Step 6: Stand up and as you do, use the momentum to lift the dumbbells up to your shoulders.
    7. Step 7: As soon as you get the dumbbells to your shoulders you are going to squat back down.
    8. Step 8: Now stand back up and as you do push press the dumbbells up over your head.
    9. Step 9: Bring the dumbbells back down to your waist. This completes one repetition.

    Jessie Man-makers

     

    Air Squats Technique

    Step 1

    Stand with your feet a little wider than hip-width apart, your toes turned out slightly and your arms resting at your sides.

    Step 2

    Engage your abdominal muscles and broaden across your chest by gently pulling your shoulder blades in towards each other.

    Step 3

    Bend your knees slowly, pushing your butt and hips out and down behind you as if you are sitting down into a chair. Keep your head and shoulders aligned over your knees and your knees aligned over your ankles. Keep your weight balanced evenly between the front and back of your feet.

    Step 4

    Lower your body until your thighs are parallel to the ground. Keep your knees externally rotating, or tracking over your toes; don’t let them fall inward. As you lower down, raise your arms up and in front of you no higher than parallel to the ground. Maintain broadness across the chest and lift the torso up off the thighs.

    Step 5

    Straighten your legs to come up, and lower your arms back to your side.

     

    Double Whip Smash (Battling Rope) Technique

    Bring both arms up and forcefully slam the rope down to the floor to create big waves. Throw your body into it by jumping and bending at the hips to generate more power.

     

    Posted in Uncategorized | 6 Comments

    Workout of the Week #3

    This week your challenge will consist of two basic exercises: Rowing Machine & Wall Ball

    Please read all directions below before proceeding to the workout.

    Men will be using a 12 pound medicine ball and women will be using a 6 pound medicine ball for Wall Ball.

    Complete this workout in your best time possible:

    Row 2000m at a damper setting between 5/6
    50x Wall Ball (12M / 6W)
    Row 1000m at a damper setting between 5/6
    35x Wall Ball (12M / 6W)
    Row 500m at a damper setting between 5/6
    20x Wall Ball (12M / 6W)

    What is really going on during this workout?

    This week is designed to have you withstand a constant heart rate zone throughout the entire workout without fatiguing.  Endurance is a large component of how we improve our aerobic capacity (cardiac output).  This increase in cardiac output will lead to your heart becoming more efficient by pumping more blood per beat and at a slower rate.  This saves your heart from working too hard at rest and will allow your body to push more blood to working muscles during workouts such as these.  Ultimately by enduring these types of workouts on a regular basis you will notice a positive correlation between this workload and a decrease in resting heart rate, recovery heart rate, and lower resting blood pressure. In other words, you will become more fit when you implement these workouts at least once a week.

    Directions on Technique that counts…

    Form is crucial for every rep to count.  Squats on Wall Ball must be parallel.  Women must aim at a 9 foot target and men at a 10 foot target.  This workout must be completed in the large cardio room near the large gym.  The reason why it must be done in that spot is because Wall Ball must be done in the large gym.  I have marked two distinct spots on the left (West) wall (on the brick).  These two points on the wall are marked with a blue tape line…one at 9 feet and the other at 10 feet.  Use a newer rower, if possible.  They’re the rowers with the word Concept 2 on the side and have blue handles.  They look exactly like this:

    Concept 2 Rower

    It’s fine if you wish to setup your computer for each distance but I highly recommend getting on the rower and just start rowing each segment without fiddling around with the computer.  Once you start rowing, the display will turn on and start accounting for the meters you row.

    Rowing Technique…

    The Rowing Stroke

    The rowing stroke can be divided into two parts: The drive and the recovery.

    You will learn a coordinated movement pattern built upon the following positions and phases:

    The Recovery (Phase 1)

    • Extend your arms until they straighten.
    • Lean your upper body forward to the one o’clock position.
    • Once your hands and the oar handle have cleared your knees, allow your knees to bend and gradually slide the seat forward on the monorail.

    The Catch (Position 1)

    • Arms are straight; head is neutral; shoulders are level and not hunched.
    • Upper body is at the one o’clock position—shoulders in front of hips.
    • Shins are vertical and not compressed beyond the perpendicular.
    • Balls of the feet are in full contact with the footplate.

    The Drive (Phase 2)

    • With straight arms and while maintaining the position of the upper body at one o’clock, exert pressure on the foot plate and begin pushing with your legs.
    • As your legs approach straight, lean the upper body back to the eleven o’clock position and draw the hands back to the lower ribs in a straight line.

    The Finish (Position 2)

    • Legs are extended and handle is held lightly at your lower ribs.
    • Upper body is at the eleven o’clock position—slightly reclined with good support from your core muscles.
    • Head is in a neutral position.
    • Neck and shoulders are relaxed, and arms are drawn past the body with flat wrists.

    Here is a link that shows you a video on rowing technique:

    http://www.concept2.com/indoor-rowers/training/technique-videos

    Wall Ball Technique…

    Keep the Torso Vertical
    The more upright your torso, the more you can translate power from your hips into the wallball.  Here are a couple of things that will help you:

    • Foot placement
      Play with the placement of your feet, the wider your feet the greater amount of space we have for our hips to go down.  Bearing in mind we don’t want to be so wide that we are unable to gain depth (hips below knees) or so wide that we lose vertical drive.  As a start, I would recommend going slightly wider then shoulder width apart, and more toed out then usual.
    • Move your hips in a vertical plane and not a horizontal plane
      If you emphasize moving your torso up and down rather than back and forth you will save your back and use more legs to drive the ball up.

    The Throw

    • Throw towards the wall, not just straight up and down
      Without any horizontal force you risk not touching the wall.  If you do touch the wall with just a purely vertical throw, the ball will probably slide down the wall and impact your ability to reload quickly as you will need to change body positions to catch it.  There needs to be a subtle bounce at the apex of the throw.
    • Forearms vertical and under the ball – elbows down!
      Imagine your forearms as arrows, they need to point where you want the ball to go – UP!

    The Catch

    • Catch high, ride low
      Catch the wall ball high, and let it ride/push you to the bottom – imagine your self like a human piston.  When you get tired your instinct will be to catch high and hold the ball in your hands.  This doesn’t put us in a good position to reload, as we will need to hoist the ball back to our shoulders, or do a weird under arm throw.  So as much as you can, catch it high, and ride it low with the elbows under the ball.

    wall-ball-a-ex.jpgwall-ball-a-ex.jpgwall-ball-a-ex.jpg

    Posted in Uncategorized | 11 Comments